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competition we were not doing very well, and we were not educating our children to the level we needed to remain competitive. it had almost nothing to do with the federal government at the outset. up rockas been a tactic of barack obama himself adopting this common core. a survey in connecticut, 72% of teachers, we are talking about literacy --e, embrace it. only two percent or three percent inc. it will lead to lower or worse results. others are not taking up position. when you have that embracing of a concept and teachers and administrators have had the time to look at what people want to inhasize, they are moving the right direction. we have seen no movement to abandon our common core. we need to hold ourselves accountable for success. >> it you think about the common core? what are the key strengths? about thenything implementation you are nervous about? >> there are fewer things but deeper. the ability to use those things we are learning successfully. whether it is in support of or inal thinking mathematics being able to answer promptly, i think that is the real strength. i think
i want to now recognize the chairman of the higher education and workforce committee mr. kline for five minutes. >> thank you madam chair into the witnesses for being here. you are quite excellent. how does your idea looking at your testimony would require students to take the azt or the sat and meet the threshold scores based on the gpa. i listened to the testimony and you talk about how you have a greater success rate if they have had a high school education and so forth. i do not understand how this would work for the millions of what we are still calling nontraditional students, people going back to the community college or for-profit school or something like that to get a particular skill. .. to find an alternative way to achieve standards. for example, after one semester of satisfactory academic proprogress in a community college they become reeligible even if not under rigorous high school standards. >> so if they had the low s.a.t., act they have to go the first semester not qualifying for a pell grant. but if they demonstrated then academic capability they would be? >>
millions of other families that, what's wrong with mom? it was not the education about alcoholism and drug dependency that there is now. it took dad -- dad searched through several doctors before finding a doctor that had the courage to say your wife's an alcoholic. that was not just the image anybody accepted. found the right doctor, dad -- excuse me -- had the courage to say we're going to do this intervention, the whole family went in, did the intervention with mom, and, you know, at that time, i never heard the word "intervention," and now you got tv shows that do it. it was a different time. we did it. dad led the intervention, and my memory of that is very clear. he walked in the door that morning, all the kids, dad, surprised mom, took her hand and said, betty, we're here because we love you, the kids want their mother back, i want my wife back, and those interventions are tough. i mean, that is tough, hard, hard, hard work. a lot of tears. a lot of crying. a lot of raised voices. a lot of hugs, more raised voices, denial, and not denial, and i mean, it goes back and forth. it's a t
mandela died thursday. he was 95. coming up on c-span2, a hearing on higher education affordability. then senate judiciary committee chairman talks about human rights. and later an update on veterans disability claims. >>> a house panel investigation cost of higher education and the use of pell grants. we'll hear from student financial aid and higher education officials. this education and work force training subcommittee hearing is two hours. [inaudible conversations] the subcommittee will come to order. good morning. thank you for joining us for our hearing on pell grant program. we have an excellent panel of witnesses here this morning. we look toward to their testimony. this hearing is the 11th in the series designed to gain a more complete understanding of the challenges facing post secondary students and institutions. the hearings held to inform the committee of policy changes that should be considered as part of the upcoming reauthorization of the higher education act. we abbreviate hea. over the last year the hearings provide a forum to discuss opportunities to encourage inn
of the american federation of teachers, spoke about the report. she spoke about the efforts to improve education. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreateni
education act? >> yes, one of the was and it permitted daily attendance process and we tide that process so that if a student is but a circle time right now, before that money will the process goes over to check to see that student has in fact started attending the class that the aid is going to be paying for. if they have not had an attendance record, the financial aid does not go through so we have closed the loophole between students eligible for class. >> and the students are fully aware of that? >> yes, they are. and every semester him as you might imagine, we do have a faculty that does not record attendance and a student comes in wanting to know where their money is. so it is a way to close that gap and the other thing that we have done, this is for all of our students that are only online, prior to dispersing funds it gives us a list of all of those students and we have seen multiple students coming from the name address and we would not disperse this, we would do a further check and this includes a father-son or something akin to that. that we have not had multiple students coming
home offer access to everything from education, to health care, to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history -- a belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months. so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all- time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles -- to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for
people are coming and make sure they check in. we do find education is a key way of protecting children. if you get children into school, it's a daily mechanism for teachers and outside people check are they withdrawing? are they fed properly? do they need other things? behind the greatest protection is to make sure the schooling us back and get kids back in school. whether they are moving to family site for schools and apollo would be key for the future. but the support for recovery phase, shelter is going to be a key area. we were lucky the church actors have been trained in disaster risk reduction. they knew how to register, how to do triage in certain areas. we need to continue processes is philippines continue to be hit by bigger and bigger storms would need to focus on the science of communities. i would also propose we strengthen the emergency response capacity of the local mission. i know ms. steele has been strong the development aspect of supportive of the construction efforts that have gone there. i don't think they have the team and staff to respond to a three to five-year e
go back to early childhood education. we created an office of the early childhood. we took operations out of four different departments and put them in one office to be housed within the department of education but now we have one operation concentrating on early childhood education is supposed to public health and child welfare and that sort of thing. we have it all together and i think that's going to allow us to bring a more efficient delivery system on board for early childhood education. but there is this kind of dynamic ,-com,-com ma and it's not a good dynamic between general government and education one will pick on the other and there will be weaknesses of the other that have an sauna regular basis. trying to get people working together hand-in-hand is difficult to do and i'm finding it more difficult to see it happen across districts and community lines than i would have thought. having said that we are making progress nonetheless. part of it is just i think what is really going on and what will push a lot of this is that we are very dependent on property taxes so beyond the
children are precious commodity in the hope is we will do some things to help them with their education. the senior citizens, persons who are not able to take care of themselves to the extent you and i can take care of ourselves, i would like it if you'd comment on efforts made to help them comment on the efforts to help reestablish schools as quickly as possible. she indicated the number one concern to shelter. this was the case of coors in louisiana after katrina, shelter is a great importance. as well as in sri lanka. i know we have a lot of experience dealing the shelter after these tragic events. i also know what is true about them being in harms way to this very day because the hurricane season -- well, the typhoon season for them, which is the zenith at apex of the month of december. so there may be something else living on the right. their number one need to shelter. if you'd comment on the shelter issue. one additional comment and complement with reference to the ability to move 800,000 people, that is remarkable. it is no small feat in to do this at the limited amount of time
there. he'll be talking about education policy. [inaudible conversations] >> hey, good afternoon, everyone. we're going to go ahead and get started. hey, how you doing this afternoon? i'm rick hess, director of education policy studies here at the american enterprise institute. happy to welcome all of you to join us today for this promising and, i think, intriguing conversation with connecticut governor dan malloy. delighted to have those of you who are here with us and also those of you watching at home either via live stream or on c-span2. the hashtag for the event is hashtag ct ed reform, that's capital ct ed reform. feel free to follow along or join in. we are going to be going for an hour, until 2:30. format's going to be pretty straightforward. first, governor malloy, dan malloy of connecticut, has been kind enough to agree to share some thoughts on the dos and don'ts of school reform in connecticut, what are some of the lessons they've learned as they have tackled this work. i'm going to then have an opportunity to chat with the governor for 15 or 20 minutes, ask him a cou
a few things that were on our list that we just had to get done. the tax code had to work, education had to work. you had to have regulatory system that worked. you had to be fast on the dime in working with the private sector because they could take their investment and go elsewhere real fast. so we had our own little strategy. and i would guess that you sitting down, what is the strategy for hawaii? what is it that you must get ght to survive in the 21st century? and that then define what is you need to do even if you find yourself in the minority position. >> did i hear you correctly are you the only republican in the tate senate? >> i'm actually in the house. but there is one senator out of 25 in the senate and there are 7 out of 51 in the house. so we are eight out of 76. >> we're trying to change your dynamic. >> well, the united states capitol there's a saying in the house that the other political party is the opposition. but the enemy, the enemy is the senate. so i guess we temporarily lumped you in with the enemy. so we're sorry about that. it sounds like your side emphasizes qu
then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have great public education and we have ways for people to enter or reenter o
growth is greater than would be without them. where women and girls are given the chance to be educated and to get the healthcare they deserve to have, we know that societies benefit. where women and girls can participate in peace making and peace building as full members of society trying to resolve conflicts, we know that resolution is more likely to be sustained. it's a great honor for me to have this award. but it is a reminder of how much more we have yet ahead of us to accomplish. to make sure that tom's dream, tom's life, the examples of the award recipients with us and those unable to come, bring out in each of us our own commitments to what we will do to further the cause of human rights, universal human rights for every man, woman, boy and girl in the world. it is certainly what tom would expect us to do to hold high his ideals and by accepting this award and knowing that tom would not let me off the hook, otherwise, it is something that i will continue to be committed to in every way that i can with every fiber of my being. because the kind of world we want is a world in whi
on education and other schools are falling apart. throwing money is not the answer. we have to allow them to north innovate. we must end corporate welfare and crony capitalism. we must encourage policies that will lift up the individual. allow creation for new jobs and improve the schools. can't be a bailout though. it won't work. it would lead us further down a path of dependency. more jobs are only one part of the solution though. i believe we must also show that we can build on a government that values our god given rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life a
that is done here. and all the non-profits that call the arc home offer access to everything from education to health care to the safe shelter from the streets. which means you're harnessing the power of community. to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your reflects the tradition that run through our history. the blood vessel we're greater together than on our own. over the last two months washington has been dominated by some contentious debates. i think it's fair to say. and between a reckless shut down by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act, and admitly poor execution on my administration's part on implementing the latest stage of the new law. it's not surprising the frustrations with the are at the all-time high. we know the frustrations run deeper than the most recent political battles. their frustration is rooted in their own daily battles fop make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hay work, the deck stacked against them. it's rooted in the fear they kids w
together, he a democrat, i, a republican. each other and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform. on getting things done. we love the environment on you can actually achieve results. that's the great thing of being a governor. i look at so many of the members of the utah state legislature who are here. and with each one of them, i can tell you stories about how we things done and the can-do attitude. it was remarkable. senate went on to the and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on that l hill, something evan knows a lot about. ournt on to china to become senior diplomat running the embassy there. nd we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to ecome part of the no labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to ind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. ome to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we system.two-party
the minimum wage, equal pay for women, and in the workplace, earl -- early childhood education and pre-k have been part of his proposal all along. i was excited to hear what he said echoed. when women succeed, america succeeds, and this is our agenda. income inequality, as he pointed eroding thely middle class, which is the backbone of our economy. earlier, a representative from kentucky talked about how it is the right thing to do to improve the health of thousands of his citizens over the next decade. he also talked about it from an economic and fiscal standpoint. 50 million dollars will be injected into kentucky's economy. it will bring $800 million to the state treasury, create 17,000 jobs and support their glad toso we were very hear what he had to say at the press event and afterward. in few areas has a lot been of greater impact than in the lives americans with chronic conditions. if you had insurance that you liked before, whatever it was, it is going to be better now because of no pre-existing conditions being a barrier to your access to insurance. also removing lifetime or even on t
of color, and workers with less education. that's not particularly surprising because these are the workers who even in a robust economy have the most difficulty getting jobs in the first place for a variety of reasons, including discrimination. the very fact of long-term unemployment is affecting these workers ability to get new jobs. i know many of you are cosponsors on legislation that would prohibit discrimination against the long-term unemployed, which is a measure we would encourage you to take up as soon as we can. but the focus is on extending benefits. finally, i want to stress again the importance of renewing the program, not just because of the workers who will be affected, but for the economy overall, for the labor market overall and for our society overall. we know unemployment insurance is one of the most effective economic stimuli that we have. cbo scored this just the other day and said if the program is renewed, it could account for as much as .3% in gdp growth and an additional 300,000 jobs. if it is not renewed, it will have the opposite effect. that is very damaging to o
, it requires us to inform them about the health -- yes, there's a significant amount of education that goes on. as anybody can kids knows, it's hard to educate somebody who's not interested to hear what you're saying. the -- you know, it's traditionally been challenging for us to educate to the groups of people that we were able to provide health insurance to. so yeah, i see that as being a very significant challenge. >> i was back in the district last weekend. i had dinner at a restaurant. the waitress came over and recognized me, a big supporter. she told me her story, that she lost her job, now is working two jobs all because of the health care. she had lost it when they found out about this employer mandate before they delayed that, right. they had to reduce their employees. now she's working two jobs. do you have a lot of waitresses or people on your staff that are working two jobs to make ends meet? >> we have a significant number of people doing that. and we have -- what we've seen is there are a lot of people who need part-time jobs. that's because wage and job growth in permanent full
like lisa or vera or stan educated, experienced, long tenured workers who can only find jobs that pay far less than the jobs they have lost. i think that that is something we really need to think about in terms of the future consequences of this crisis. it will be a huge crisis if the program is not renewed. there is no question that will affect millions upon millions of people, but long-term unemployment has long-term consequen consequences and builds deficits into our future. we need to take those into account as you all craft policy, we as advocates promote policies. this is not just an immediate problem. it's a long-term crisis for our country. >> i would love to hear from you all. are people saying, hey, lisa, vera, we would hire you, but we know you wouldn't stay here for this $8 an hour, so therefore, we aren't going to hire you? >> representative moore, here is how i want to answer that. you can't prove age discrimination, but i lost my job of 14 years two weeks before i turned 50. two black happy birthday balloons were very appropriate this year. on the online job application
government levels. and finally, prioritizing clean water, proper sanitation, hygiene education to preventing or responding to disease outbreaks. basically what we do together right now is the front-line response. we want to make sure people are safe, people have access to basic services and this continues on through an evolution. women and girls would potentially be at less risk, especially in evacuation centers of comprehensive plan to improve security for revenue growth is developed and implemented with cooperation of national police and other security services. opportunities for women to earn a living, especially those in households are essential for protections for abuse and exploitation. the context for recommendations include the typhoons disrupting sources of income for over 5.6 million men and women. i read that this morning i didn't realize how many people had lost sources of income. i beg you looking at a million, 2 million people. this morning it was 5.6 million women and children for women and men. it was astounding. the filipino department of health are warning several diseases
of economic development, improved education, enabling techniques for developing new energy resources. the challenge is our a mess. the free flow of ideas that test societies not yet ready to respond, or those wild card or network threats such as the nontraditional threats posed by non-nationstates cyber actors. these types of threats continue to test us on a daily basis. i think the world of cyber and everything out there in the generation for the of young people involved in getting an education today, and where you may be, as i look at my career backwards 33 years and look forward to the kinds of things i have experienced, what one can imagine, what i can imagine standing here today, projecting myself maybe 30 years ahead and trying to think of all of the changes i have seen and many of the others in this room that have been around a little bit, the kinds of dynamics we have seen change. in the information world in just the last work -- five or six years, facebook only came onto the scene in 2005. today, over half a billion people are connected via twitter. these are just some of th
a lot of thriving businesses that we are proud of. and we a role in economy have a well-educated workforce. we focus a lot on exports. the issue for our constituents are about how much things cost. the concern about the cost of gas. the cost of college. concern about the cost of health care. those kinds of issues are what they are focused on right now. the second thing is what was mentioned about the unity on wanting congress to work that are together. they are angry about this gridlock. we are out of the downturn. teens are stabilized and there are things we should be doing like immigration reform. i appreciate your work on that. i am on the judiciary committee and have worked on provisions on the business side of that issue. we are proud of that senate immigration bill. we want to get it done. it frustrate you to be known as the do-nothing congress? senate side, there are some major things we have gotten done. nearly half of our leaders are women. we have moved ahead on a lot of bills. the shutdown really brought a lot of things to light. this is ridiculous. a are holding us ba
as a resource and not a cost. education and training must therefore be looked at very closely to ensure that we empower the workers, raise productivity levels and meet the skills needs of a modern economy. important work will have to be done in and significant resources devoted to the areas of science and technology, including research and development. government is also convinced that organised labour is an important partner whose cooperation is crucial for the reconstruction and development of our country. that partnership requires, amongst other things, that our labour law be reformed so that it is in line with international standards, apartheid vestiges are removed and a more harmonious labour relations dispensation is created, on the basis of tripartite cooperation between government, labour and capital. the government is determined forcefully to confront the scourge of unemployment, not by way of handouts but by the creation of work opportunities. the government will also deal sensitively with the issue of population movements into the country, to protect our workers, to guard against the
the health care. yes there's a significant amount of education that goes on and it's as anybody with kids knows it's hard to educat harder to ey that isn't interested in hearing what you have to say. you know what has traditionally been very challenging for us to educate to the groups of people that we were able to provide health insurance to so i see that as being very significant. >> when i was back in the district last weekend, i had dinner at a restaurant and the waitress came over and recognized me, a big supporter and told me her story that she lost her job and was working two jobs because of the health care that she lost when they found out about this employer mandate before they believe that, right clicks and they had to reduce their employees and now she's working two jobs. do you have other people on your staff that are working two jobs? >> we have a significant number of people doing that and what we have seen is there are a lot of people who need part-time jobs come and that is because the wage and job growth in the permanent positions hasn't been there while the cost of housi
not only had an incredibly active career, but some of the u.s. concentrated on higher education and educating himself. he is a man with three graduate degrees, including one from the u.s. naval war college, and i should add that we were proud to present him with an honorary degree here just a couple of years ago. i should not neglect to say, general flynn has been given many awards, including the defense superior service medal with three oakley's clusters, the legion of merit with an of leaf cluster, the brand star, the meritorious service medal and others that are not too numerous to mention. he is a great friend of this school, and we are honored that you could join us and the floor is yours. >> thank you. [applause] >> great. first, before i get into some formal remarks, i hopefully -- everyone got handed out one of these. it is that there are your see your you got it when you walked in. a pamphlet about the defense intelligence agency and other about who we are all we're doing a behalf of national security for this country. it will give you some idea about the direction of o
support the work that social enterprises do, that anchor institutions like hospitals and educational institutions and others can do to create jobs, again, specifically focused on individuals and communities that have the largest challenges this attaching to our economy. so we don't have a date for that yet, but we're going to set it. we're working on it. and so we'll send invitations out to all of you again since you've been with us today, so look for that in the next couple of weeks. thank you again for joining us today. have a happy thanksgiving, and shop small business on saturday. [laughter] [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> today the leader of french opposition party talks about france and the rest of the international community. he'll discuss a range of issues including the eurozone crisis and his country's refusal to sign off on the recent iranian nuclear deal. we'll have live remarks beginning at 6:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the for dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about dos b specifically, and i ki
of individual employment the administrative burden of educating and processing enrollments and declinatideclinati on's can prove almost as expensive as the coverage itself. restauranrestauran ts cannot absorb this cost and ultimately the cost will be borne by the public as a whole. the implementation threatens the safe haven of the flexible work environment for those who depend on it. thank you for the opportunity to testify before you today regarding the health care law and its effects of the business aggregation rules on small businesses like ours. i'm proud and grateful for the responsibility to serve my community in austin texas serving customers. we are committed to working with congress to find solutions that foster growth and truly benefit the communities we serve. >> thank you mr. winstanley. our final witnesses donna baker. she holds an mba from michigan state university and a b.a. in accounting from siena heights university. welcome. >> thank you chairman collins and ranking member velazguez and members of the committee. it's an honor to be here to testify on this
discusses education legislation passed this his state concerning teacher accountability, charter schools and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about his agenda at a forum of the american enterprise institute beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies this 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and best selling author tom standage has a new book out, and it's called "writing on the wall." tom standage, what do cicero and twitter have in common? >> guest: well, the idea of the book is that social media is a very old idea. we think that it's recent and only people alive today have ever done it. but really what i'm arguing is there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the era of cicero, so that's the first century b.c., and the point is that you don't need a digital network to do social media. if you have one, it goes faster, but you could actually do it in the old days. cicero
list that we just had to get done. the tax code had to work. education has to work. you had to have a electric regulatory system that worked. you have had to be fast on the dime in working with the private sector because they could take their in investment real fast. so we had our own little strategy. what is the strategy for hawaii? what is it that you must get right to survive in the 21st century and that defines what you are able to did with your legislatived about did i ann if you feigned yourself in a minority meteorologist. position. >> are you the many many republican? >> seven out of 51 in the huhs. we are 8 out of 76. those were the numbers. >> representative, we were trying to change your dynamic. >> there is a saying in the house that the other political party is the opposition. but the enemy, the enemy is the senate. so i guess we temporarily lumped you in with the enemy. we are sorry about that. sounds like your side emphasizes quality, not quantity in the state legislature so i would take the approach, my state is a more republican state altogether. i used to tell my f
to learn about risk management. more and more companies like td ameritrade are taking all of the education and insights that they need to know and delivering it free of charge. >> is that like the casino? >> i do not think so. in terms of the sustainability of my business, i will continue to have a job. education is a key component of that. the more successful our clients are, the more successful our businesses will be. >> next question. the amount of options and derivatives in td ameritrade at the time was about 9% of volume. it is now in the mid-40's. that is incredible growth. there is a different climate. how do we move this huge growth down to this younger generation? how do we make it so that it is investable for them? >> absolutely. this goes back to what i was saying before. make sure you are providing the tools for that younger generation. think about how they live now. they are gaming on their mobile devices. it could be video or written. they like to follow and interact socially. that is one of the things that we have done with dough. we provide all of those avenues for the youn
faith and insistence on the importance of education, and his personal dignity and strength in the face of the injustices of the segregated south taught our supreme court justice everything he needed to know to meet the challenges and opportunities that were ahead of him. the sisters at saint benedict and saint pius added a few things too. [laughter] initially, young clarence thomas was called to the priesthood and he entered the seminary. the call gradually lost its strength and a bigoted comment by another extinguished his determination. -- his location -- his vocation. in fall 1968, he enrolled at holy cross college. yale law school came next. after earning the elite degree, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of g
are much more highly educated and well trained. they are dealing with complex software systems and they are costing more because we invest a lot more in them and it costs more to retain them. there are opportunities in the private sector that are greater. part of the thing driving these military personnel costs to some degree is the technological advancement and the fact that we are expecting -- what we are expecting out of them in terms of training and performance is higher than it was 23 years ago. host: earlier you mentioned the cost of military pay. a "new york times" op-ed last month suggested that military pay should be put on the table. host: do you think it is likely that pay would be a target as the pentagon looks to cut costs? guest: i think that pay as a target is an interesting idea. i don't think anyone is going to flat-out reduce military pay. "the new york times" editorial notes this is a politically and emotionally fraught area of the budget to be debating. i cannot imagine an area where people would be saying you are going to be getting less than this year. wha
, their education, their experience said, "no." why? because they don't want president obama to have these people on this important court. they want to keep the court with a majority of republicans. that is wrong. it's wrong. and there were many reasons that we did what we did but it was the right thing for the country. it's the right thing for democracy. i ask unanimous consent that the senate proceed to executive session to consider nominations calendar number 30, 347, 348, 349, 450, 383, 382 accident 384, 386, 434, 435, 436, and 437, that the nominations be confirmed, the motion to reconsider be considered made and laid on the table, no further action, any statements related to the nominations be printed in the record, that president obama be immediately notified of the senate's action and the senate then resume legislative session. the presiding officer: is there objection? mr. alexander: madam president, reserving the right to object. the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. alexander: thank you, madam president. reserving the right to object. and again, i'll make my comments a
to educate your thumb, you transfer the money from your face to your friends face and to drop money on their face. [laughter] it is like just the most fun you'll ever have paying someone back. so that's really what i wanted to share with you today about simple. i would just say if you looking at an industry that is really, really collocated, that is where the opportunity lies. health care, finance, banking, i mean, these are really complex industries and they are just screaming out for help. if i could leave you with one thing is, seek out the complexity and simple quiet. thank you. [applause] >> i'm actually not very good at listening to other people. i'm used to talking so this is kind of weird. next up is alex mittal. no, alex. let's go. this will be fun. from the founders club. how are you? >> i want to hear more plain stories. >> we met this morning for the first time and again on her show. we had a little chat. it was good and tell everybody, what do you do? >> i worked with the founders club. we are the first online venture capital firm, and i saw some common themes with the
that they are one of the top schools in the country now in offering good primary care education and internal medicine opportunities. i believe it is coming. it is a crass expression, but i think it is true, you have to follow the money. you have to follow the money with regard to reimbursement, with regard to educational opportunities and where the money is for assistance for students, follow the money all the way through the process. i also think scope of practice is very critical. we have got to find that her balance with the way care is provided today. let's give nurses more authority than they have today. we can do a lot better in designating proper roles as we look at good prevention and wellness as well. >> hi, senator. i am with the national academy for state health policy. one of the areas you mentioned was the role of states. i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about some of the long-term consequences for the different experiences you will be having from state to state. i am thinking a state like new york where they have done their own marketplace and they are expanding m
their families, maybe to send their kids to school for a better education and a better future. failing to do that does just the opposite. i'd ask the senator from ohio if he would include in this the affordable care act? mr. brown: yeah, i think that's right. i -- first of all, the points that the assistant majority leader was making about the bipartisanship is -- has been -- i think is exactly right. and what's -- what's most not discouraging but most -- perhaps the most disappointing part of this is even as recently as 2007, president bush signed this bill. we passed it -- it was my first month or two in the senate when we passed it. it was a big bipartisan vote in the house. it was a big bipartisan -- i remember exactly the numbers in the senate. lots of republicans joined i believe almost every democrat or maybe every democrat. but again, it was gladly signed by the republican president of the united states. and you can trace from the time of the minimum wage, when hugo black sat at this desk and helped to write the minimum wage and president roosevelt signed the bill, for all these deca
of education is year and a journey would want to write to you on that specific case. but actually one of the things this government has done is remove the dead hand of bureaucracy and centralization to make sure that the parents of the free education can teach the way they judge best and the parents have a greater role whether want to and the running of our schools. >> mr. charles kennedy. >> thank you with reference back to the question from the honorable gentleman, perhaps the honorable friend on this issue, would the deputy prime minister agree that for the coalition stand on europe, actions actually speak louder than words? and would he agree that the chances decision sometime back to assist the irish economy, the for secretaries and responsible conduct of the intra-european government to review and the deed the prime minister's own watch this week in china, that get this reference he wants to recommend we stay in? this is a great boost of confidence for people like him and need. [shouting] >> mr. speaker, it is -- it is always a joy to hear the mischievous wit and wisdom of my ri
in the education community west teachers are going to start teaching to the test. but for some of the evaluations do. congresswoman titus could attest to years in academia. you don't want to test knowledge of multiple-choice exams. that is comprehensive understanding and that is what our big concern is that the american legion. thank you. >> i thank the gentleman and i thank you call today for your testimony in the work you do on found [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> this'll be our final count today. we welcome mr. tom murphy, director compensation service the veterans benefit administration, all so this sub one of the regional office. we also welcome sondra mccauley, deputy assistant general for audit evaluations of the office of inspector general department of veterans affairs. ms. mccauley is accompanied that mr. brent arronte, director of san diego benefit inspections division. we appreciate your attendance today. complete amid statements will be in the hearing record. mr. murphy, you're now recognized for five minutes. >> chairman runyan, ranking member tightness, than
it will be implemented. ashington journal, live every on ing at 7:00 a.m. eastern c-span. >> the house education examines the college of affordability and the pell grant program. at 10:00 e it live a.m. eastern on c-span 3. eastern, juan manuel santos speaks at the the nal press club about economic and political situation in colombia. that's also live on c-span 3. >> as you walk in, there are tables out in front with lots of right?ts, not the -- prior to entering the gun show. how he pamphlets are about the government is trying to take away the right to own guns and the government is doing this, that. is doing obama care is terrible. those were the guys that i wanted to talk to. were the guys with the leaflets, with the ideas. like this yourself. you?id who are i said i'm a -- i'm an academic. i'm a researcher. the researcher on these rganizations and these ideas and try to understand the guys. and study the men who believe this stuff. said -- they m looked at me. they asked me questions. here's what i ok, am. i don't get it. but here's my job. i want to understand how you guys see the world. i want to u
-house education collegettee examines affordability and appel grant program. you can see it live at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span three. colombian president one man well santos speaks at the national press club about the economic and political situation in colombia. that is live also on c-span3. >> as you walk in, there tables out front with pamphlets, prior to entering the gun show. howpamphlets are all about the government is trying to take away your guns. those were the guys i wanted to talk to. they were the guys with the leaflets. i said to them. is this yourself? and they said yeah, who are you. i said i am an academic, a researcher and i'm doing research on these organizations and these ideas and trying to understand them. a bunch of them looked at me suspiciously and said -- and asked me questions. i said look, here's what i am. i don't get it. here's my job. i want to understand how you see the world. i want to understand your worldview. look, you will not convince me, and i will not convince you. that is off the table. what is on the table is at one to understand why you think the way you do
to help with the education. the senior citizens, persons who are not able to take care of themselves to the extent that you and i can take care of ourselves. i i would like it if you can comment on efforts being made to help them comment on the schools. the earths to help reestablish schools as quickly as possible. and finally, when we met with the mayor she indicated that the number one concern was shelter. the number one concern was shelter. this was the case, of course, in louisiana after katrina, shelter was great importance. it was a case in haiti, and pakistan as well as in sri lanka. and i know that we have at lough experience in dealing with shelter after these tragic events. but i also know what you said is true about them being in harm's way to this very day. because the hurricane season, the typhoon season reaches -- apex in the month of december. there may be something looming on the horizon. the number one need is shelter. if you could comment on the shelter issue. finally, one additional comment and compliment, if you will, reference to the ability to move 800,000 peopl
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